Player Guide Project

Forum rules, feedback, speak with game masters, suggestions, etc.

Moderator: Game Masters

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby C.C. » 12 Feb 2010, 04:41

Dah, typo. My bad. A lot of the names and etc from those schools are also direct translations from me, so their accuracy is ~95%. If there's a better one, just let me know.

EDIT: The overall goal, I think, is for me to put out enough details so people COULD start roleplaying as people from one of these schools. I think what I'm going to do is starting from interest. Someone interested in playing a Mo scholar? Great. I'll go post style of dress, bases, and an in-depth philosophical structure that would make it easy for someone to pick up.

I'll also see if I can find references, though many of these works haven't been translated. Of course, you could always have the character "consult a master." ;)

This is the beginning of a long project I had in mind. I'd like to make the roleplays a little more detailed by giving players something more than a simple skeletal structure to work with.

EDIT 2: Daoism is different than Yin-Yang. The jury's still out as to which one came first, but we suspect Yin-yang came long before Daoism. Bluntly put, whereas Daoism proposes the following of the Dao, which is the way of balance, Yin-Yang proposes a system of checks and balances that is sort of ... multi-dimensional. The five element theory? Gold-Wood-Fire-Water-Earth? Yeah, that's from Yin-Yang originally. Basically, an action will match one of the elements, and according to an extremely complicated schematic, one can determine what's a good time for what sort of action, and the like.

Basically, part of Yin-Yang got merged with Ru, and part of it got merged with Dao. It might explain why Yin-Yang isn't around after the Han dynasty, but it's interesting nonetheless.
Last edited by C.C. on 12 Feb 2010, 04:49, edited 1 time in total.
Xi Zi(23/F) 55-84*-80*-51-98* Arson; Artisan (e); Charming (e); Duelist; Jeer; Medic; Navy; Study; Spy; Zeal

60% Injury from Tony the Tiger.

Sort of bored still. Though, open to recruitment efforts.
User avatar
C.C.
Experienced Officer
 
Posts: 273
Joined: 21 Jul 2009, 12:49

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby Xu Yuan » 12 Feb 2010, 04:46

An incredibly impressive and in-depth list. Great reading and fantastic food for thought, unfortunately I don't have much to add to this, but keep up the good work C.C, as well as JG Chan and Xeniphon. Though yes, I had thought the structure of Yin and Yang was essential to Taoist thought? Or was it later conjoined with it? Does the Tao te Ching mention Yin and Yang? I should probably reread it.
Pre-Game

Cai Bin 蔡臏
Rank: Senior Political Advisor (Civil Rank 1)
5-10-63-95-85 (68)
Articulate. Negotiator(e), Propaganda, Networking, Rumor, Wealth, Riot
Gold: 559
(V5) Mi Zun
User avatar
Xu Yuan
Cao Cao’s Duck Hat
 
Posts: 2801
Joined: 27 Jul 2005, 13:33
Location: Wan
Kingdom: Han

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby StromwellKnight9 » 12 Feb 2010, 04:48

Yes, I think most of the schools make reference to Yin and Yang due to its presence in the Shijing (诗经, Classical Book of Poetry). Some refer to it more than others, though. Anyway, I defer to C.C. on this one...I unfortunately slept through most of my Hist Asian Culture classes...

Also, though some of them haven't been translated, some of them have. Reading them really gives you insight on the schools and their thoughts, but they can be very difficult reads.

If you look in the Hundred Schools of Thought thread, you can find some great examples of what this RP would (maybe should) sound like. Basically, quoting texts as much as possible really helps. This is near my major field, and I don't feel comfortable RPing as a member of one of these schools yet.

BTW - Great job C.C., when I'm not up late doing Chinese homework, I'm going to study that list more carefully. Would have been a great review sheet when I took the class a few semesters back =).
Hai Xiangli 海祥丽 Style - Yuhe 玉河 (24)
80*-44-97*-51-68*
Skills:Aid (e), Charming, Invent, Navy, Reversal, Tactician, Wile
User avatar
StromwellKnight9
Experienced Officer
 
Posts: 253
Joined: 11 Feb 2005, 22:05
Location: The Citadel of the White Serpent
Kingdom: Gao Wu = awesome

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby C.C. » 12 Feb 2010, 04:57

Xu Yuan wrote:An incredibly impressive and in-depth list. Great reading and fantastic food for thought, unfortunately I don't have much to add to this, but keep up the good work C.C, as well as JG Chan and Xeniphon. Though yes, I had thought the structure of Yin and Yang was essential to Taoist thought? Or was it later conjoined with it? Does the Tao te Ching mention Yin and Yang? I should probably reread it.


Yup, see above answer. Unfortunately, I cannot cite passages from the school of Yin Yang, as most of what we have are, unfortunately, fragments and fragments of the copies. And we should probably move the discussion elsewhere, or else we'll clean stuff up in a few days.

The main scholar, Zou Yan, had a ~10k text work called Zou Zi, as well as a ~10-15k text work called the Supplement to Zou Zi. Unfortunately, this book did not survive, though we have references to it all over the place, so we KNOW for a fact that it existed. Zou Zi is a scholar of Qi, so after Lao Zi. However, the stuff he's been proposing has been around for a while, so... we really don't know too much.

One of the key proponents Yin-Yang proposes is this thing called 五德终始, which is basically... there are five "De," or "kindnesses" (really just a term for goodness), according to the five elements. From what we can pin together, they're both meant to be taken literally, as well as figuratively as analogies for how a ruler should govern. These five elements counter and interact with each other, forming his philosophical theory.

For example, from a quotation of Zou Yan, it read: "邹子有终始五德,从所不胜,木德继之,金德次之, 火德次之,水德次之"

Which translates to: Zou Zi has [ultimate] five De, and is always victorious with them. (The "ultimate" refers to the Earth, which is supposely the ruling used by Huang Di). The De of Wood is its successor, then the De of Gold, the De of Fire, and lastly, the De of water.

In Lishi Chunqiu (encyclopedia Qin-nica, pretty much.) it is mentioned that one of the concrete examples of the "Jin De," or De of Gold is that a ruler should use his gold wisely, and reward officers frequently. He should even reward officers who are, without merit though having no fault of their own. As such, they will work harder for the lord knowing that he's a generous man.
Xi Zi(23/F) 55-84*-80*-51-98* Arson; Artisan (e); Charming (e); Duelist; Jeer; Medic; Navy; Study; Spy; Zeal

60% Injury from Tony the Tiger.

Sort of bored still. Though, open to recruitment efforts.
User avatar
C.C.
Experienced Officer
 
Posts: 273
Joined: 21 Jul 2009, 12:49

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby C.C. » 13 Feb 2010, 04:08

Military Ranks and Structure of the Latter Han – An interpretative guide for the generals of SimRTK

I will probably clean up all of this stuff once I'm done past the first drafts, into a giant compendium.

Citations and sources: Primarily from Han Shu (Book of Han), part of the Twenty-Four Histories. All impromptu translations are done by me, and while I have attempted to adhere to the original meaning of the text, I am only an amateur scholar – please cut me some slack if there are small errors here and there.

So, you're here looking at the ranks, and going "huh, I am a General who Guards the East," or "mm, I am a General of Warboats." You might be wondering about what those ranks actually mean, in a role-playing sense. I will have a separate post detailing the non-military positions and their respective duties, but for now, here are some basic information of the military.

To begin, we must first understand the military structure of the Han dynasty, which is applicable to the Three Kingdoms period as well. The first, perhaps, is that the military is divided into three explicit branches, two of which are not really applicable to our roleplayers. The branches are respectively, Jingshi (Imperial Army), Junguo (Provincial and National Army), and Bianfang (Border Army). Jingshi refers to the army stationed in the Imperial City, the North and South Armies, as well as the most elite forces, known as the Yulin (feather forest) armies, which is basically commanded by the Emperor himself. Most of our roleplayers will be (highly likely) coming from the Jingshi Army, as it is the most well-trained and the largest.

Historically, at this time, because of the lack of infrastructure, the Jingshi Army was splintered into various factions, commanded by each individual warlord. While the Junguo and Border armies are prevalent, they are less formalized, and thus, less easy to narrow down.

In terms of general command: The Han Armies are usually in a "base five" system. The most simple unit is a "Wu," or "five," in which there is a squad leader for every five men. For two groups of five, it is called a "Shi," which literally means ten. Five "Shi" turns into a "Dui," which translates to squad or team, and is considered to be the basic, operational fighting unit. These fifty-man units have a "Dui lu (pronounced Lu-e, like green)", which is basically equivalent to a Sergent or captain. This information might be handy when structuring plots, as basic, rudimentary formations in the Art of War and other military treatises can be carried out with a Dui.

For every one hundred men, you have a "Tun," in which the "Tun Zhang," or "Captain" is loosely equivalent to the Roman Centurion. Every two hundred men, an extra official, known as "Jun Hou," or Lieutenant is added. Every four hundred man, there is a Sima, who is basically an officer in charge of discipline, logistics, and supplies.

The Sima is responsible for his own "Bu," which is a military unit. Four of these units constitutes a "Ying," which means "camp" but is really a basic, fully supplied, and cohesive fighting unit. A Bu will have its own musicians, banners, commanders (known as Ya Jiang or Pian Jiang, literally, "Side General" or "Assistant General" (In other words, all the dudes Zhao Yun slaughtered in the novel are probably these guys), while a Ying will have the administrative and logistical officers to handle all the other things, such as food supply or camp establishment.

At this point (the Ying level) we begin to get usage of the world "Jiang jun," or "general." Since you are considered to be a general, which means, from a roleplaying stance, you have these basic "rights." By rights, I mean that the regular NPCs and citizens of China would find it to be perfectly acceptable for you to possess....

Right to have bodyguards and servants.
Self explanatory. You almost always have men (and sometimes, women) with you. Generals usually do not keep private guards, though they may have followers assigned to them according to their ranks (see the next section for explanation). If you're young, male, and still unmarried, expect to be swarmed by young, somewhat desperate women.

Ability to command troops up to your "level" in roleplaying through virtue of the Bing Fu.
I must add a note here to how this work. The "Bing Fu," or Authority of Command, is extremely important in Chinese history. They're basically little things of Jade or precious stones, split in half, usually in the shape of a fierce animal or a seal. These are items of power in the sense that with such symbols, a general is free to command as many troops as his particular Bing Fu allows. The ruler will be able to keep one half, giving the general the other half to prove that it is legitimate.

With the Bing Fu, the general is allowed to request troops from any military base or camp anywhere, as well as the required supplies that is necessary. He does not need to disclose the function or what he's doing with the troops - simply that "I need 9,000 halberds. Give now or face the wrath of the Emperor later." In fact, it is absolutely NECESSARY for the general to have one of these things to order an army - since mobilizing the army without such an item is considered to be treason.

In the Han dynasty, for example, a Black Hawk Bing Fu will allow the general up to three thousand men, a Flying Fox Bing Fu, eight thousand, and so on. I can provide a list, but it's probably more fun making things up on your own. These men are to obey the general as they would obey the Emperor - failure often means punishment under military law, which is A) death, B) castration, or C) something worse. I cannot count the number of times in which a general managed to usurp the throne or position because he had in his hand one of these and the ruler at the time was too stupid to realize that the general might betray them.

Obviously, giving one of these (no matter how small the amount) is considered to be a great symbol of trust. The ruler is basically saying "here, you can have these troops. I trust you that you can do whatever you want with them." And of course, it is also a great honor for the general to receive these. Once a Bing Fu is given, it is for the general to keep UNTIL the ruler SPECIFICALLY asks for it back. Understandably, if a high-ranking general has suddenly been demanded that he should return his Bing Fu back to the nation, then he should perhaps reconsider how he is viewed in the eyes of his ruler.

Also, you usually only have one of these. So it's rarely a case of "I have four White Dragons, two Black Turtles, and six Flying Foxes, which gets me ... 70,000 troops". It's more like "Here, Black Iron Arrow. 70k troops to take out the invaders please." As the general increase in rank, they tend to trade in their Bing Fu back to the ruler for ones that gives them more troops.

(If roleplaying as a Sima or General) The right to execute or punish according to military law.
Simas are unique in the sense that they are both generals and also officers of justice. I make this note specifically because the Sima only needs to make a note to the general before offing someone (a mook, for example) for breaking the rules.

The ruler may also grant the general the right of "Xian Zhan Hou Zhou," which means "Execute first, report after" as a highly efficient but scary method to keep civil order. It is EXACTLY what it says on the tin. The general has the ability to execute the troublemaker or rebel first, and then report it to the appropriate authority after. Usually, if the people KNOW a particular inspector or general have this ability, they'll probably be on their best behavior.

The reason why the XZHZ is so powerful is that no one, barring extremely high ranking officials or people with special immunity from a particular ruler can really protest against it. Clearly, not a power to be handed out like candy, but it did play a prominent role in many aspects of the Han military.

(if roleplaying as a simple general) The right to ignore orders from the ruler on the field of battle.
This is a HUGE thing in ancient Chinese culture. A common saying goes, "Jiang Zai Wai, Jun Ming You Suo Bu Shou," which translates to "when the General is out on the battlefield, the Command of the Ruler may be politely ignored (literal translation: politely refused)."

Obviously, it is never a good thing to ignore direct orders from your general. However, from an NPC perspective, the behavior is excused, somewhat, by that particular paradigm mentioned above. In other words, the ruler have very little moral ground in which he/she could punish you by. If you value your head, however, it might be good to listen to your ruler.

The above, of course, is only a summary, but that should give you a better idea of what a general of Han is capable of. Even at the lowest right, you have a lot of role-playing power at your disposal. Consider applying bits and pieces of it to make your life more interesting.

Yulin: The Yulin army is a special case, as they are truly supposed to be the elite forces. Serving as both a palace guard and a personal army of the Emperor, the Yulin armies are commanded only by the Emperor with his special seal (unless he gives it away in the case of a national emergency). This makes it important. The regular Bing Fu can call troops from any camp or base, but the Yulin army cannot be summoned or used in any situation unless you have that particular item, from the emperor, in your hand.

Yulin - "feather" and "forest" have several meanings. Like feathers on a bird, the Yulin army protects the Emperor. Yu implies closeness, "trusted," and oftentime "kinsmen." A common Chinese expression uses the term "Yu Yi," or "feather and wing" to describe followers of a particular person. As for "Lin," it carries the same meaning. The basic gist of the phrase, then, implies that the Emperor's protectors are as many as the feathers on the bird and as numerous as the trees in a forest.

One of the requirements, of course, is that a Yulin guard needs to know how to shoot on horseback. Archery was not only a valued skill - it was a perquisite in addition to all the other common tests.

What this means to our role-players: It is entirely possible that your character have background from the Yulin armies - families of military generals and soldiers tend to have someone who was badass enough to make it in there. However, it doesn't make any sense for you to serve someone who isn't the Emperor, so keep that in mind as you design a character backstory.
Xi Zi(23/F) 55-84*-80*-51-98* Arson; Artisan (e); Charming (e); Duelist; Jeer; Medic; Navy; Study; Spy; Zeal

60% Injury from Tony the Tiger.

Sort of bored still. Though, open to recruitment efforts.
User avatar
C.C.
Experienced Officer
 
Posts: 273
Joined: 21 Jul 2009, 12:49

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby JG Chan » 13 Feb 2010, 04:35

Whee, I learned stuff! :D Seriously, very informative again, and great to have for RPers. I think some of the ideas have been present already, but attention paid to them have varied. The right to ignore rulers' orders when on the field is well-represented in the priority list for tactics, as Xeni mentioned in his Tactics post. And an example of 'Execute first, report later' occurred during the Yiling campaign, when Sun Quan gave Lu Xun his sword, if I recall.

As a caveat, though, we should keep in mind that not all players will know or want to act with this level of historical accuracy. As mentioned somewhere in the OOC thread, the mindset of a Han dynasty Chinese person is quite different from the typical player's. So it can be interesting and fun to use a lot of this info, but if the people you RP with don't really acknowledge it and keep going their own way, then it'd be best to compromise, I think.

About the Yulin army, I've heard of it from various places, but I don't think it was mentioned much in the novel itself (unless it was translated into something not immediately recognizable). For the current game especially, where it's been a while since the Han has fallen and a lot of people have common backgrounds in their bios, how significant would a Yulin army background be, I wonder?
Qu Shiyin 曲诗音 (28), 书记 (+35%)
60*-49*-91*-96*-110*
Aid (e), Articulate, Artisan (e), Charming, Networking, Propaganda, Rally (e), Rumor, Study, Wealth, Zeal
GM NPCs: Cao Ren 曹仁, Zheng Hun 郑浑, Pang De 庞德, Li Ru 李儒, Huang Yueying 黄月英, Guo Huai 郭淮
User avatar
JG Chan
Doesn't speak English
 
Posts: 4460
Joined: 23 Mar 2005, 21:07
Location: Link overloaded XD
Kingdom: 闞ちゃん!

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby C.C. » 13 Feb 2010, 04:59

If I'm looking for a historically accurate role-playing game, I'd probably seek out a Chinese forum. :P

The fact that I'm not suggest that my purpose here is something else, and that is really to open up the possibilities for people who may wish to incorporate such elements in their roleplaying. Consider it a manual of sorts - the type that people usually don't read. ;) What I'd really like to do is sort all of the information I have (and will be posting) into another thread, where people who would like to have the RP background can knock themselves out reading my densely packed text.

I think I asked for a location to put it, and it was thought that this was the best place for it until they could figure out something to do with me and my posts.

Yulin: The basic premise is this. To get into the Yulin army, it generally means that your ancestors had some relation or deed to the royal family. Either that, or you were extremely talented. Either way, it's a convincing way to build a pseudo-noble background, which many players tend to favor, and being the son of a wealthy merchant is hardly the case, as merchants weren't really ... respected, so to speak, in ancient China.

It is referenced in the Annals of Wei, and the specific rank is also mentioned in the Book of Latter Han, as "Yulin Lang."
Xi Zi(23/F) 55-84*-80*-51-98* Arson; Artisan (e); Charming (e); Duelist; Jeer; Medic; Navy; Study; Spy; Zeal

60% Injury from Tony the Tiger.

Sort of bored still. Though, open to recruitment efforts.
User avatar
C.C.
Experienced Officer
 
Posts: 273
Joined: 21 Jul 2009, 12:49

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby JG Chan » 13 Feb 2010, 05:02

Thanks for the answer, and fair point. :) I just thought it should be mentioned somewhere, especially if all of this eventually gets sorted into a nice, actual Player's Guide.
Qu Shiyin 曲诗音 (28), 书记 (+35%)
60*-49*-91*-96*-110*
Aid (e), Articulate, Artisan (e), Charming, Networking, Propaganda, Rally (e), Rumor, Study, Wealth, Zeal
GM NPCs: Cao Ren 曹仁, Zheng Hun 郑浑, Pang De 庞德, Li Ru 李儒, Huang Yueying 黄月英, Guo Huai 郭淮
User avatar
JG Chan
Doesn't speak English
 
Posts: 4460
Joined: 23 Mar 2005, 21:07
Location: Link overloaded XD
Kingdom: 闞ちゃん!

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby Xeniphon » 13 Feb 2010, 13:17

I'll go about organizing it in a day or so into something that people can read through and see where things are needed and such. For now just keep throwing stuff out, editing and making it pretty can come later.
Oh well, back to the drawing board...

V6 Character: Now Undecided
User avatar
Xeniphon
SimRTK's Own Cyborg
SimRTK's Own Cyborg
 
Posts: 4440
Joined: 22 Mar 2005, 18:40

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby Dong Zhou » 14 Feb 2010, 11:23

Right to have bodyguards and servants.
Self explanatory. You almost always have men (and sometimes, women) with you. Generals usually do not keep private guards, though they may have followers assigned to them according to their ranks (see the next section for explanation). If you're young, male, and still unmarried, expect to be swarmed by young, somewhat desperate women.


in games terms though, I don't think most PC's have bodyguards so that might mislead people.
<stattingXe> Dong Yan 65-63-89-70-74 Statting (e)

Li Jun (160) 90-61-70-30-60 Skills: Aid, Blitz, Charge, Leader, Scout, Vehemence

Officer Profile

PM me if I'm in an rp with you and haven't responded, just means I forgot or missed your post. Or PM if you want an RP
User avatar
Dong Zhou
I'm A Diversion!
I'm A Diversion!
 
Posts: 10693
Joined: 15 Apr 2005, 08:15
Location: hidden in my couch fort
Kingdom: None

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby C.C. » 14 Feb 2010, 17:55

Dong Zhou wrote:
Right to have bodyguards and servants.
Self explanatory. You almost always have men (and sometimes, women) with you. Generals usually do not keep private guards, though they may have followers assigned to them according to their ranks (see the next section for explanation). If you're young, male, and still unmarried, expect to be swarmed by young, somewhat desperate women.


in games terms though, I don't think most PC's have bodyguards so that might mislead people.


In an RP sense, I would assume that the only game mechanic this would affect are in plots. It's going to be hard to kill a general in public or private because of this particular point - even the lowest ranking officers have a pair of Jia Shi (Armored Soldiers) that comes with the rank.

It's something that people could choose to have, if they would like to RP in such a way. :P
Xi Zi(23/F) 55-84*-80*-51-98* Arson; Artisan (e); Charming (e); Duelist; Jeer; Medic; Navy; Study; Spy; Zeal

60% Injury from Tony the Tiger.

Sort of bored still. Though, open to recruitment efforts.
User avatar
C.C.
Experienced Officer
 
Posts: 273
Joined: 21 Jul 2009, 12:49

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby Dong Zhou » 14 Feb 2010, 18:40

If your sleeping in barracks or in camp during campaign, or the kingdom has that in as a counter plot maybe
<stattingXe> Dong Yan 65-63-89-70-74 Statting (e)

Li Jun (160) 90-61-70-30-60 Skills: Aid, Blitz, Charge, Leader, Scout, Vehemence

Officer Profile

PM me if I'm in an rp with you and haven't responded, just means I forgot or missed your post. Or PM if you want an RP
User avatar
Dong Zhou
I'm A Diversion!
I'm A Diversion!
 
Posts: 10693
Joined: 15 Apr 2005, 08:15
Location: hidden in my couch fort
Kingdom: None

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby C.C. » 14 Feb 2010, 18:55

Generally, only the "non-commissioned" (I use the term non-commissioned here in a different sense in that they do not count as a "formal" element of the army) sleep with the men in the barracks. To be sleeping in the same place with the men usually is a sign of the general's willingness to be on the same "status" level as his troops, which often is recorded as a nod of respect to the character in question. There's even a specific term (中军帐) used to describe the general's quarters.

I bring it up because I think people don't have an accurate idea of what an army camp might look like, or what the ancient Chinese military is capable of. Oftentimes they are (both rightfully and wrongly) depicted in western media as little better than peasants handed spears.

Though, I am going to quote TF2 Snipers. In this case, professionals have standards. ;)
Last edited by C.C. on 14 Feb 2010, 19:25, edited 1 time in total.
Xi Zi(23/F) 55-84*-80*-51-98* Arson; Artisan (e); Charming (e); Duelist; Jeer; Medic; Navy; Study; Spy; Zeal

60% Injury from Tony the Tiger.

Sort of bored still. Though, open to recruitment efforts.
User avatar
C.C.
Experienced Officer
 
Posts: 273
Joined: 21 Jul 2009, 12:49

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby Dong Zhou » 14 Feb 2010, 19:07

and few people do sleep in the barracks in the game which tends to mean the plotter doesn't have to worry about all those mean soldiers
<stattingXe> Dong Yan 65-63-89-70-74 Statting (e)

Li Jun (160) 90-61-70-30-60 Skills: Aid, Blitz, Charge, Leader, Scout, Vehemence

Officer Profile

PM me if I'm in an rp with you and haven't responded, just means I forgot or missed your post. Or PM if you want an RP
User avatar
Dong Zhou
I'm A Diversion!
I'm A Diversion!
 
Posts: 10693
Joined: 15 Apr 2005, 08:15
Location: hidden in my couch fort
Kingdom: None

Re: Player Guide Project

Postby Xeniphon » 14 Feb 2010, 22:12

From all my work in counterplots I have asked many questions. If your PCs have bodyguards and they are statless NPCs (ie; you made them up) you can have 1, possibly 2. However they are not highly rated if a plot arises. If however your kingdom dedicates actualy troops to this task (ie; drafted and trained solders) then they are given greater weight in plots. The idea is that you cant just suddenly decide you have 100 guards with you at all times so beyond a reasonable level the kingdom actualy has to contribute resources to it or else they dont exist. As a note, very few kingdoms are willing to dedicate troops to such a task.
Oh well, back to the drawing board...

V6 Character: Now Undecided
User avatar
Xeniphon
SimRTK's Own Cyborg
SimRTK's Own Cyborg
 
Posts: 4440
Joined: 22 Mar 2005, 18:40

PreviousNext

Return to Hall of Supremacy

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

Copyright © 1998–2016 SimRTK Project Team. All Rights Reserved

 
cron